Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Now Aldi biscuits are the latest target for Chinese shoppers -

Now Aldi biscuits are the latest target for Chinese shoppers - and they are snapping up 1,000 boxes of the all-natural treat every DAY in a buying frenzy


  • Demand for the Australian-sold Aldi biscuits, Knoppers, is skyrocketing in China
  • Up to 1000 boxes of Knoppers are ordered from Chinese consumers each day

  • Knoppers are just the most recent Australian-sold product picked up by China
  • They follow baby formula and Weet-Bix which both saw overwhelming demand

First it was baby formula, then it was Weet-Bix, and now it is chocolate coated wafer biscuits called Knoppers which are in overwhelming demand from the Chinese market.
The wafer biscuits, sold at Aldi, are just the most recent in an ever growing series of products picked up by savvy consumers shipping Australian store-bought products to China.
The newfound demand for the German-made product is part of the race to sell trusted western foods to the Chinese market for a profit.   
The race to sell trusted western foods has now lead the Chinese market to the popular German-made product, Knoppers (pictured) 
The race to sell trusted western foods has now lead the Chinese market to the popular German-made product, Knoppers (pictured) 
Chinese marketing expert Livia Wang told News.com.au there were a range of reasons a product might be picked up and become the next craze but Aldi's Knoppers' popularity came down to price.
'The reason they (customers) started buying them was because they were a good price,' she said.
'With something like this it is that several daigou see that it is sold at a discount, they think that's a good price, let's buy say, 100 units, and start selling it. Other daigous will start thinking this must be very popular so I'll start selling it too.' 
These customers purchasing the product in Australia for the sole purpose of selling it in china were dubbed Daigous; Chinese shoppers which included stay at home mums and international students. 
'The reason they (daigous) started buying them was because they were a good price,' Chinese marketing expert Livia Wang said
'The reason they (daigous) started buying them was because they were a good price,' Chinese marketing expert Livia Wang said
Ms Wang also said Knoppers already had a high profile in China, and that paired with their price drop fuelled the increased demand
Ms Wang also said Knoppers already had a high profile in China, and that paired with their price drop fuelled the increased demand
Ms Wang also said Knoppers (left and right) already had a high profile in China, and that paired with their price drop fuelled the increased demand
Ms Wang also said Knoppers already had a high profile in China, and that paired with their price drop fuelled the increased demand.
The marketing expert said she had seen as many as 1000 orders for a box of Knoppers in just one day and it had been that way for the past three or four months. 
The wafer biscuits are just the most recent product in a string of Australian-sold products to be picked up by the Chinese market. 
The Chinese demand for baby formula grew so rapidly that customers were pictured with trolleys piled high with tins of baby formula, ready to be shipped overseas
The Chinese demand for baby formula grew so rapidly that customers were pictured with trolleys piled high with tins of baby formula, ready to be shipped overseas
As overseas demand for baby formula skyrocketed in China, Australia suffered from a shortage for the product.
The Chinese demand grew so rapidly that customers were pictured with trolleys piled high with tins of baby formula, ready to be shipped overseas. 
The demand from Daigous pushed prices up from $25 to $100 for a single tin as bulk supplies were bought for cheap in Australia and shipped to China. 
Demand for the product was so great due to the price discrepancy between Australia and china. 
The demand from Daigous pushed prices up from $25 to $100 for a single tin as bulk supplies were bought for cheap in Australia and shipped to China
The demand from Daigous pushed prices up from $25 to $100 for a single tin as bulk supplies were bought for cheap in Australia and shipped to China
The demand from Daigous pushed prices up from $25 to $100 for a single tin as bulk supplies were bought for cheap in Australia and shipped to China
Weet-bix was the most recent Australian product to gain the attention of the Chinese market
Weet-bix was the most recent Australian product to gain the attention of the Chinese market
The price of weet-bix soared to a staggering $50 for an online order (pictured) 
The price of weet-bix soared to a staggering $50 for an online order (pictured) 
A similar demand for the Australian cereal Weet-Bix was developed when the product was showcased on Chinese soap opera Ode to Joy. 
The product placement sent the price of Weet-Bix soaring to a staggering $50 for a 1.4kg box on Chinese import websites, when they were sold for just $5 in Australia.
Due to the massive demand, China became the number one export market for Weet-Bix this year.
Demand for the Australian cereal weet-bix skyrocketed when the product was showcased on Chinese soap opera Ode to Joy (pictured)
Demand for the Australian cereal weet-bix skyrocketed when the product was showcased on Chinese soap opera Ode to Joy (pictured)
The product placement on Ode to Joy (pictured) sent the price of weet-bix soaring to a staggering $38 for a 1.4kg box on Chinese import websites, when they were sold for just $5 in Australia
The product placement on Ode to Joy (pictured) sent the price of weet-bix soaring to a staggering $38 for a 1.4kg box on Chinese import websites, when they were sold for just $5 in Australia