Monday, July 16, 2018

How China is Emerging as the Leading Global Player in the Arab World

How China is Emerging as the Leading Global Player in the Arab World


Image result for How China is Emerging as the Leading Global Player in the Arab World

China is stepping up cooperation with the Arab world. The recent China-Arab States Cooperation Forum (CASCF) was aimed at deepening economic and security cooperation between Beijing and Arab countries of the Middle East and North Africa within the framework of the One Belt, One Road project, analysts told Sputnik.
China has outlined a "future-oriented strategic partnership of comprehensive cooperation and common development" for Arab countries — something that no other country has offered to the region — during the eighth ministerial meeting of the China-Arab States Cooperation Forum (CASCF) that was held on July 10 in Beijing.
"The Chinese leader [Xi Jinping] has put at the forefront the maintenance of security in the region, which is significant," Maria Pakhomova, a researcher at the Institute for Oriental Studies at the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) told Sputnik China. "The fact that [China] made the security issue a priority, in particular, the resolution of the Syrian, Yemeni, Palestinian crises, the provision of financial aid to meet humanitarian needs of these countries, indicates China's need for stability in the region. As for proposals in other areas of cooperation voiced by China, none of the external players has made such attractive offers to Arab countries."
Thus, Beijing has offered Arab states a $20 billion loan for the industrial development and restoration of their economies. China is due to create a Sino-Arab interbank association, which will allocate $3 billion for the financial sector.
The Russia academic emphasized Xi's idea of the unified fate of China and the Arab countries: "There was no such a wording before, as there was no such a large package of final documents," Pakhomova noted, referring to the Beijing Declaration, the Action Plan for 2018-2020 and the Declaration of Action on China-Arab States Belt and Road Cooperation.
According to The South China Morning Post, "Beijing will also further explore the possibility of free-trade deals with each of the 22 states in the Arab League," a regional association of Arab states in North Africa, the Horn of Africa and Arabia.
Speaking to Sputnik, Wang Zhimin, director of the Center for Globalization and Modernization at China's Institute of Foreign Economy and Trade, underscored that Sino-Arab cooperation goes on "within the framework of the implementation of the Belt and the Way," adding that "China attaches great importance to this project."
"In his speech, Chinese President Xi Jinping stressed that China promotes economic recovery through industrial revival and grants loans to Arab countries on a commercial basis to implement trade and economic projects," Wang pointed out.
The Chinese scholar explained that the One Belt, One Road initiative is primarily focused on the development of cooperation in the field of transport, communications and energy. He added that the Arab countries' need for industrial development further increases the potential of Sino-Arab cooperation.
At the same time, China's position regarding the provision of loans or assistance to other countries differs a lot from the perspective of Western countries, Wang insisted.
"Our philosophy is this: 'jointly discuss, jointly build and share.' Cooperation between China and Arab countries does not inflict any economic harm on them being based on mutual benefits, overall gains, openness and inclusiveness," the Chinese scholar emphasized.
Meanwhile, it was announced that Syria, Jordan and Yemen would receive humanitarian aid of $90.5 million from Beijing, while $15 million would be provided to the Palestinians in the form of economic and humanitarian support. At the same time, Beijing promised that it would assist the Palestinian National Authority in promoting its diplomatic interests at the United Nations.

China Has Been Preparing For A Trade War For Over A Decade

China Has Been Preparing For A Trade War For Over A Decade


The crash of 2008 brought with it a host of strange economic paradigms rarely if ever seen in history; paradigms which have turned normal fiscal analysis on its head. While some core fundamentals remain the same no matter what occurs, the reporting of this data has been deliberately skewed to hide the truth.
But what is the truth? Well, at bottom, the truth is that most economies around the world are far weaker than the picture governments and central banks have painted. This is especially true for the United States.
That said, one country has been pursuing an opposite strategy for many years now — meaning, it has been hiding its economic preparedness more than its weaknesses. I am of course speaking of China.
When we mention China in the world of alternative analysis, several issues always arise: China’s expanding debt burden, government spending on seemingly useless infrastructure programs like “ghost cities,” China’s central bank and its corporate subset misreporting financial figures regularly, etc. All of these things fuel the notion that when a global fiscal disaster inevitably takes place, it will emanate first from China. They also give the American public the false impression that a trade war against China will be easily won and that China will immediately falter under the weight of its own veiled instabilities.
However, if one actually studies China’s behavior and activities the past decade, they would see a method to the apparent madness.
In fact, some of China’s actions seem to suggest that the nation has been preparing for years for the exact geopolitical conditions we see today. It’s as if someone warned them ahead of time...
In terms of prepping for a trade war with the U.S., China has implemented several important steps. For example, for at least the past 10 years the country has been shifting away from a pure export economy and reducing its reliance on sales of goods to the U.S. In 2018, Chinese consumer purchases of goods are expected to surpass that of American consumers. For the past five years, domestic consumption in China accounted for between 55% to 65% of economic growth, and private consumption was the primary driver of the Chinese economy — NOT exports.
The argument that China is somehow dependent on U.S. markets and consumers in order to keep its economy alive is simply a lie. China is now just as enticing a retail market as the U.S., and its domestic market can pick up some of the slack in the event that U.S. markets are suddenly closed to Chinese exports.
The problem of swiftly growing Chinese debt is presented often as the key argument against the nation surviving a global economic reset or trade war, with its “shadow banking” system threatening to unleash a long hidden credit crisis and stock market plunge. But this is not the complete story.
The exact amount of fiat printing that China’s central bank undertook after the 2008 crash is not known. Some estimates calculate China’s debt to now sit at around 250% of its gross domestic product. By normal standards this would suggest a credit crisis is imminent. But was China’s sudden interest in debt expansion a reactionary matter, or was it part of a bigger plan?
Just after 2008, a common argument against China’s resilience was the notion that China was dependent on holding U.S. dollar reserves in order to keep its own currency weak. Meaning, Chinese companies had to sell goods to the U.S. in exchange for dollars, which they then exchanged to the central bank for Yuan. China’s central bank then held those trillions of dollars in reserve as a means to keep the dollar artificially stronger on the global market, and the Yuan weaker, thus supporting and perpetuating the old export model.
Obviously this argument is no longer applicable, or outright absurd.
China’s own debt expansion and Treasury bond issuance actually started way back in 2005 under the “Panda Bond” program. At the time it was treated like a novelty or a joke by the mainstream economic community. Today, it is a powerhouse as Yuan denominated assets are spreading around the world.
China no longer needs to hold dollars or dollar denominated assets in order to keep its currency weaker for export markets. It can simply inflate and monetize its own debt, just like the U.S. does. But why would China bother to do this at all? Why jump into the same debt game that has caused so much trouble for western nations?
Perhaps because they know something we don’t. During the initial phase of the derivatives crisis, the possibility of China joining the International Monetary Fund’s Special Drawing Rights basket leaped to the forefront. With the Yuan as an SDR basket member, its potential to become a financial center for global trade rather than just an export and import hub would be assured. But the IMF set certain requirements before China could join.  One of these requirements was far greater currency liquidity and a more “freely usable” Yuan market. In other words, for China to join the SDR basket they would first need to go into considerable debt.
This is exactly what they did; not to prop up their banking system (though this made for a valid excuse) or to necessarily prop up their stock markets. Rather, China wanted a seat at the table of the “new world order,” and they bought that seat through massive debt expansion. China was officially included in the SDR basket in 2016.
China has been a very vocal proponent of the SDR basket system, and it becomes clear why if you understand what the globalists intend for the future of the world’s monetary framework. This plan was first outlined in the globalist controlled Economist magazine in 1988 in an article calling for the beginnings of a global currency in 2018. The article states that the U.S. economy and the role of the dollar as world reserve would have to be diminished, and that the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights basket could be used as a bridge to set up a single currency for all the world’s economies.
This currency would of course be administered and controlled by the banking elites at the IMF.
Since 2009, China’s central bank has called for the SDR to become a “super-sovereign reserve currency,” in other words, a global currency system. In 2017, the vice governor of China’s central bank stated that central banks should increase their use of the SDR as a unit of account and that greater SDR liquidity should be encouraged. In 2015, China’s central bank suggested that the SDR system should “go digital,” creating a digital version of the reserve so that it could spread quickly.
It should come as no surprise that the IMF is in full agreement with this plan and has even suggested in recent articles on its website that cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology are the future evolution of the monetary system.
Notorious globalist George Soros revealed a few darker details of what the IMF calls the “global economic reset” in an interview in 2009; these details included a diminished American economy, a diminished dollar and for China to become a new economic engine for the world.
Finally, China has clearly been prepping for a considerable crisis in the dollar or in the world’s economic stability as shown in its sudden and aggressive stockpiling of gold reserves the past decade. Only recently surpassed by Russia in purchases, China is one of the most aggressive national buyers of gold. An expanding gold stockpile would be an effective hedge against a collapsing dollar market. If the dollar loses its world reserve status, nations like China and Russia are placed well to mitigate the damages. Considering the fact that the IMF officially holds around 3,000 tons of gold, the globalists are also well placed for a dollar crash.
It would appear that China has been included at many levels in the plan for the global reset. All of the previously mentioned actions suggest foreknowledge of a dramatic shift in the dollar model. The trade war itself provides perfect cover for the economic reset, as I have been warning in my latest articles. China would play an important role in the reset, as they have the ability to dump U.S. Treasuries and the dollar as world reserve, causing a chain reaction through global markets as their trading partners follow along in a domino chain.
They will likely do this quietly (as Russia recently did), in order to pawn off their T-bond holdings before news of a Treasury dump hits the mainstream. The primary beneficiaries of this act will be the globalists, while China has placed itself to survive (not necessarily to thrive) during the chaos. The same cannot necessarily be said for the U.S., which suffers from the Achilles Heel of total dependency on the dollar’s primacy.

Producers yank China’s costliest movie from screens after three meagre days at the box office

Producers yank China’s costliest movie from screens after three meagre days at the box office
The epic Asura, with a production budget of 750 million yuan (US$112 million), reported 49 million yuan during its opening weekend
PUBLISHED : Monday, 16 July, 2018

Image result for A fantasy epic based on Buddhist mythology, the movie tells the story of a shepherd Ru Yi (played by Wu), who is assigned a mission to save Asura – the dimension of pure desire as Ru used to be part of the mythical realm until a coup initiated in the lower heavenly kingdom changes all the rules. Before its release, the film received high profile government endorsement. Party officials from Ningxia attended its opening ceremony in early July, in Beijing, according to a report in People’s Daily. However, both the A-list stars and the official endorsement failed to persuade China’s film-goers. The movie got 3.1 out of 10 from 10,950 viewers on the Chinese film review website Douban and 6.4 on ticketing provider Maoyan website. Instead Hidden Man, directed by Chinese actor and director Jiang Wen, which opened alongside Asura on July 13, raked in 341 million yuan. The film also came against a number of very strong competitors, including the dark comedy Dying to Survive that has seen 2.5 billion yuan in ticket sales since its release on June 19. Alibaba owns the South China Morning Post.
Image result for A fantasy epic based on Buddhist mythology, the movie tells the story of a shepherd Ru Yi (played by Wu), who is assigned a mission to save Asura – the dimension of pure desire as Ru used to be part of the mythical realm until a coup initiated in the lower heavenly kingdom changes all the rules. Before its release, the film received high profile government endorsement. Party officials from Ningxia attended its opening ceremony in early July, in Beijing, according to a report in People’s Daily. However, both the A-list stars and the official endorsement failed to persuade China’s film-goers. The movie got 3.1 out of 10 from 10,950 viewers on the Chinese film review website Douban and 6.4 on ticketing provider Maoyan website. Instead Hidden Man, directed by Chinese actor and director Jiang Wen, which opened alongside Asura on July 13, raked in 341 million yuan. The film also came against a number of very strong competitors, including the dark comedy Dying to Survive that has seen 2.5 billion yuan in ticket sales since its release on June 19. Alibaba owns the South China Morning Post.




















The producers of Asura, the most expensive Chinese film ever made at 750 million yuan (US$112 million), on Monday decided to pull it from the cinemas after a disastrous opening weekend where it only made 49.05 million yuan.
The surprise announcement was posted on the film’s official Weibo account – the Chinese equivalent of Twitter – which did not give a specific reason for the sudden decision. Instead, the producers – which includes big names such as Alibaba Pictures, the film arm of Alibaba Group Holding, Zhenjian Film Studio and Ningxia Film Group – said they wanted to extend their “deepest apologies to viewers who did not get a chance to watch the film, as well as to all the Chinese and international participants who were involved in its production over the past six years.”
The film involved 2,500 people from all over the world. Most of it was shot in Qinghai, Ningxia and Hebei provinces in China, while 15 months was spent on the post production in the US.
In addition to Hong Kong movie stars Carina Lau Kar-ling and Tony Leung Ka-fai, 19-year-old Wu Lei, China’s teenage heartthrob, played the main character in the film.
A fantasy epic based on Buddhist mythology, the movie tells the story of a shepherd Ru Yi (played by Wu), who is assigned a mission to save Asura – the dimension of pure desire as Ru used to be part of the mythical realm until a coup initiated in the lower heavenly kingdom changes all the rules.
Before its release, the film received high profile government endorsement. Party officials from Ningxia attended its opening ceremony in early July, in Beijing, according to a report in Peop le’s Daily.
However, both the A-list stars and the official endorsement failed to persuade China’s film-goers.
The movie got 3.1 out of 10 from 10,950 viewers on the Chinese film review website Douban and 6.4 on ticketing provider Maoyan’s website.
Instead Hidden Man, directed by Chinese actor and director Jiang Wen, which opened alongside Asura on July 13, raked in 341 million yuan.
The film also came against a number of very strong competitors, including the dark comedy Dying to Survive that has seen 2.5 billion yuan in ticket sales since its release on June 19.
Alibaba owns the South China Morning Post.

Sunday, July 15, 2018

Declassified Files Reveal UK Feared Soviets, Chinese Would Acquire UFO Tech

Declassified Files Reveal UK Feared Soviets, Chinese Would Acquire UFO Tech

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Declassified Files Reveal UK 

Feared Soviets, Chinese Would 

Acquire UFO Tech



Once-classified documents being called “Britain’s X-Files” have revealed that the British Ministry of Defense spent half a century hunting UFOs, driven in some part out of concern that the Soviet Union or China had already gotten their hands on alien technology.
According to the cache of documents recently obtained by investigative researcher David Clarke, British intelligence services had two UFO desks between 1947 and 1997. One of the desks allowed people to phone in UFO sightings, while the other involved spies investigating UFO reports. 
Earlier this month, Clarke, a research fellow at Sheffield Hallam University, obtained copies of the Ministry of Defense's Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) from the ministry following a freedom of information request.
According to the UAP report, which will be released to the public after being declassified, the Royal Air Force was "particularly interested in any novel technology… propulsion, stealth and any novel electromagnetic technologies," news.com.au reported July 2. The documents also reveal that the British government was interested in finding UFOs to use against their enemies during the Cold War, which took place between 1945 and 1990 between socialist countries allied to the Soviet Union and US-led Western powers.
"Even though they have been partly censored, they can't conceal the fact the UK military were interested in capturing UFO technology — or what they coyly refer to as ‘novel weapon technology,'" Clark recently told the Sun.
"And the files reveal they were desperate to capture this technology — wherever it came from — before the Russians or the Chinese got hold of it first," he added.
In an email to Sputnik on July 2, Nick Pope, a former civil servant who worked for the UK Ministry of Defense from 1985 to 2006, said that he has been working with his former employers to ensure that files from the British government's UFO project would be revealed to the public.
"I ran the British government's UFO project and I'm pleased that a number of 'UFOlogists' have acquired documents about my old job, using the UK's Freedom of Information Act. Actually, this is part of what's been a wider 10-year program to declassify and release these files, and I've been working with my former employers to try to ensure that the final files are made available to the public as soon as possible, as part of our wider commitment to open government and freedom of information," Pope told Sputnik Monday. 
Pope also confirmed that the British government was aware of Russian and Chinese research into UFOs and was attempting to develop its own alien military technologies.
"I can confirm that we were aware of Russian and Chinese research into UFOs and into parapsychology more generally. We didn't take a definitive view on the true nature of the UFO phenomenon (we remained open-minded but noncommittal about the possibility of extraterrestrial visitation) and so we looked at the issue in terms of threats and opportunities. Even if UFOs were just exotic atmospheric plasma phenomena — as one of my colleagues in intelligence believed — we thought we might be able to derive some ‘novel military technologies' from this, and weaponization formed part of our speculation, particularly the idea of some sort of directed-energy weapon," Pope added.
"If such a thing was possible, self-evidently we didn't want the Russians or the Chinese getting there first. While I don't characterize any of this as being a race to acquire 'alien weapons', what we did was probably as strange as anything you can see in an episode of The X-Files," he noted.
According to UFO investigator John Tenney, national director of Mufon, the mutual UFO network, "one aspect, to which very little discussion has been made, with the UK's Ministry of Defence's the newly released documents concerning 'Unidentified Aerial Phenomena' (UAP) exposes that while the major governments of the world, even to this day, continue to tell the general population that there is no reason to be affected by the UFO phenomena the governments themselves are indeed interested and actively engaged in a continuing process of research and discovery."
"For decades governments, officials and the media have tended to portray those interested in UFO phenomena as irrational, delusional and/or paranoid while at the same time spending millions of taxpayer dollars investigating the same phenomena and the implications which those phenomena may contain," Tenney told Sputnik via email Monday.